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01 Straight Billiard
The Billiard is the most classic among the classics. Its style, besides offering an essential design, does not encourage annoying condensation.
We have registered five variations of Straight Billiard. (variations
PPP
  02 Bent Billiard
The "bent" pipe par excellence. As with all bent pipes, it can encourage condensation.
We have registered five variations of Bent Billiard. (variations
NP
     
 
     
03 Dublin
Originally designed and used in the capital of Ireland. Just as elegant as the Billiard, it appears more slender due to its flared line towards the top and the slight inclination of the head. The tobacco chamber, shaped as an inverted trunk, tend to burn hot in inexperienced mouths.
We have registered eleven variations of Dublin. (variations
NP
  04 Apple
It has the characteristic full and round head, but actually the tobacco chamber is equal to the Billiard. It rarely condensates.
We have registered two variations of Apple. (variations)
PP
     
 
     
05 Lovat
Probably its name comes from its birth place, Lovat, in Inverness-shire in Scotland where - by coincidence - the same name is used to describe a typical tweed colour. The bowl is the same as the Billiard but the harmonious length of the shank slightly cools the smoke as it reaches the stem. I rarely condensates. The sense of proportion is clear and the visual impact is distinct; a Lovat is a Lovat and we do not have any variations registered.
PPP
  06 Canadian
The Canadian has a long oval shank, and although it ensures a cool smoke, it requires careful handling and maintenance in order to clean the shank, because of its reduced diameter and fragility.
We have registered two variations of Canadian. (variations)
PP
     
 
     
07 Woodstock
The slender and original shape (for a classic progenitor we could already be speaking of "moved line") and forward head hide the trouble that it is to light as well as smoke this pipe.
We have registered two variations of Woodstock. (variations
NP
 
 08 Prince
Designed for the Prince of Wales Albert (Edward VII of England) who renounced the throne in order marry the American lady Wally Simpson, he never gave up his favourite pipe which he showed off in every occasion, even when receiving the tittle of Duke of Windsor.
Also known as Prince Regent, this pipe could attract the attention of beginners because of its capturing shape as well as the small size of the tobacco chamber, which limits the quantity of tobacco. In truth, considering the repetitive relighting beginners usually do and the apparent easiness of loading the tobacco, it is not very recommended.
However, it is indicated for short smoking sessions.
We have registered one  variation of Prince. (variations)
NP
     
 
     
09 Oval
Among the progenitors this is the least reproduced and diffused pipe, despite its initial success caused by the possibility - unique at that time - of carrying it in the jacket pocket. The oval shape of the tobacco chamber, by the way, makes burning difficult since it tends to concentrate the embers in the middle in relation to the walls on the elliptically curved part.
We have no variations of the Oval registered.
NNP
  10 Pot
The Pot has a rough head and large tobacco chamber, and if appropriately smoked, can offer a full and pleasant smoke. It is essential to light it correctly, distributing the flame throughout the surface, and to avoid puffing in a fast and nervous way.
We have registered four variations of Pot. (variations)
NP
     
 
     
11 Bulldog
Sporty and determined, it is no coincidence it was given the name of the dog whose head is just as full of character. The only thing it shares with the other classic group leaders is the tobacco chamber; all the rest (from the square section of the shank to the flared head) distinguishes it from the others. Slightly shorter than a Billiard, it smokes slightly hotter.
We have no variations of Bulldog registered.
PP
  12 Half Bent Rhodesian
The last progenitor (which many mistake for a banal Bent Bulldog) is the pipe wished and designed specially by Cecil John Rhodes (1853-1902). He was a slightly imperialist British politician and pioneer in the mining industry in southern Africa, he quickly made a fortune based on gold and diamonds through the companies Gold Fields of South Africa and De Beers. He baptised Rhodesia the protectorate between lake Tanganica and Transvall, which at that moment was still "free". It returned to be called Zimbabwe and the last homage to his enterprise and name remained this pipe. Because he was an influential person we cannot exclude that the entry of his pipe among the progenitors was a favour which could not had been denied.
We have registered one variation of Half Bent Rhodesian. (variations)
NP
     

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